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The last version of Internet Explorer, version 11, was released on October 17, 2013. This is a very long time ago when taking into account the rapid development of web technologies. These days it is often difficult and time consuming to get modern technologies to work well in this old browser. More and more frameworks are dropping support, and even Microsoft themselves has announced that they will fully drop support for IE in their own services in 2021.

Consequently, we have decided to not include support for IE in the Design Library website.

Luckily, there are modern options in active development. Please use Firefox, Edge or Chrome instead.

Inline links

Links can be a text or graphic that is clickable and is used for users to navigate the web, moving within a site or to external related sites through clicks.

Guidelines

Behaviour

A link should have an underline mainly on hover, so the user understands that the link is clickable.

  • The exception is when a link is hard to see in a body text, and in that case the link can be underlined at all time

Icon placement

See Pattern: Icons and actions

Do's and don'ts

  • If the background is in a darker color, it’s recommended to have the link in white with an underline. The text should be in a medium size. 
  • Button versus links: In most cases buttons are used for actions and links for navigation. 
  • Don’t use arrows in a list of links, because it can be interpreted as an accordion. 
  • Avoid making links of a complete section of body text

Specification

States

  • Text: 16 px medium
  • Link: See Colour page
  • Hover underline: Dark blue 2
  • Visited: Purple

Colours

  • Link
  • Dark blue 2
  • Purple

Copy

Copy

Use a verb in the active form that describes the user’s action

If the user is supposed to perform an action when clicking the link, try to use a verb in the active form that describes the action. It's fine to use two verb phrases, if the user must log in or go to a page to read more before performing the main action.

Never use the phrase "click here". Neither by itself nor in a longer phrase. It makes it unclear to the user what will happen. “Click here” links are also inaccessible for users with screen readers. Furthermore, "click here" doesn’t work for users that don't use a mouse or use a phone or tablet to navigate the site.

Do's and don'ts

 

Include only the necessary words

Sometimes the link can be a complete sentence, but don't make the sentence too long. Never include several sentences. Don't include preceding articles or punctuation marks.

Do's and don'ts

  • Unfortunately, this feature does not work in the browser Internet Explorer. Here you can read about the browsers we recommend.

 

Should I place the link in or after the text?

The purpose of the text decides the placement of the links. If the user is supposed to read the text in its entirety, place the link after the text or in a separate link list. If the user reads the text to act, you can place the links directly in the text.

Example of link in the text

When the purpose of the text is to help the user navigate forward, you can put the link directly in the text.

You can find the agreement under My agreements.

Example of a link outside of the text

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Adding items to a list

Although links are primarily to be used for navigation, it happens that we use linked design for actions that the customer can perform. When the link indicates that it can add more of the same item to a list, you may begin the link text with a plus sign. For instance: + Add another company

However, links that indicate that the user can delete an item should not begin with a minus.

Do's and don'ts

Related patterns & components

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